Have a question? We’d love to hear from you.

.

(714) 532-4508
cavecche@aol.com

  • No products in the cart.
  • No products in the cart.

My blog

Service Agreement Translation In Spanish

Your client can tell you, “I can`t read a Chinese contract. What am I going to do with it? I don`t know what I have to do. It may be quick, cheap and easy when we have a conflict in China, but it seems to me that is not the case at the moment. The simple solution is to provide your client with a translation for his own use and daily reference. Is it the same as the recommendation to include in the treaty a clause stipulating that the Chinese version of the contract is official and that the English translation applies, except in the event of a conflict? No no. The English translation is only for reference purposes – it does not even need to be made available to the other party, and it does not need to be signed by them. The mere copy of a contract means that there is only one language negotiation, a sentence negotiation and a version of the contract that could never be controversial. Think about how long it usually takes to design and negotiate an English-language trade agreement for your client – and to what extent the parties can argue over the registration or exclusion of a single word or phrase. In the event that two languages are used and signed by a client, negotiations and questions should focus on both contractual formats. When the parties sign a contract and it is considered part of their agreement, they should be aware of it; their ignorance of the foreign language will not be an excuse.

Poor translations lead to a loss of precise language. In many cases, a solo or small lawyer tries to save costs for the client by using a non-lawyer to translate contracts. There are stories of people using secretaries to translate contracts (“She speaks Spanish, no matter what dialect”) or use computer programs. Even obtaining flat-rate translations of translation services can be problematic if they do not explain the range of potential translations that could result from a given legal formulation. A translator may be required to choose between three, five, ten or zero words in a foreign language for a particular legal term that the lawyer originally described in a legal contract. A translator who is not a lawyer cannot fully understand the goods or services described, the terms of custom use and use in the industry used or the importance of accuracy in that description. Unless they are taken into account in translation and the legal implications of word decisions are understood, the effects of the lawyer`s carefully crafted contractual language can be totally lost when translating into a second language. Parties and their advisors should consider the time and resources (including legal fees) spent developing contracts.